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 Advanced Christian Leadership Training for International and American Students

 

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Customized Personal and Peer Mentoring

After discovering both the felt and underlying needs of potential mentees, we teach and demonstrate how to apply biblical and Christian thoughts to those needs so that they can effectively a Christian worldview to social and workplace challenges. We provide peer mentoring as well, through monthly meetings and activities with our Wilberforce Academy Fellows.

Networking with Key Allies and Resources

We also serve as a networking organization, with networking events for Wilberforce Academy Fellows, with community members, academics, professionals, and political leaders who can help them achieve their goals as redemptive change agents. 

Cutting Edge Program Events 

  We offer retreats and conferences that attempt to answer the question of how Christians can impact various social spheres by skillfully, creatively, courageously, and intelligently applying a Christian perspective to pressing needs in society and the workplace. We also provide training and support in planning a redemptive project where Fellows gain project  development and management skills. 

 

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Blog

Blog

As I often point out in these blogs, human beings around the age of college students (18 to 25 years old, roughly) have an intense need to make sense of reality.  That’s one reason why campus ministries flourish.  Given the kinds of answers on offer (as exemplified, I think, by this issue of Intelligent Life), it’s no wonder that students drift into soft or hard forms of nihilism, including drug use, hooking up for sexual one night stands, or various versions of aimless drifting.  

Most aid programs in Africa are moderate to spectacular failures. By contrast, all indications are that well-designed efforts built around income generation are the only way forward for those who want to escape poverty’s miry slough of despair.  But, how, in fact, did Africans end up in this terrible predicament in the first place?  Animism (the traditional worldview), endemic corruption, and terrible leadership are part of the answer, but…

What's Missing in the University of Minnesota's Strategic Plan?

You would think that a strategic planning document with this emphasis on big challenges would identify issues like “Finding solutions to religious-based terrorism” (anyone watched the news lately?).  Unfortunately, the reader will search the 85-page strategic plan without ever reading a single reference to religion.

Why have so many of us passively abandoned what God has established (Matthew 19:6) in favor of what he hates (Malachi 2:16)?  My concern is not so much with the party wanting the divorce as with his/her friends and associates who “cave” rather than aggressively advocate for the couple’s marriage.  One of the reasons we have caved is that we have bought into a faulty vision of marriage as a purely romantic relationship sustained by love, and only now are active Christians rejecting that faulty vision for a vision of covenant marriage with profound public consequences that include the parenting of children who will sustain the society and the possibility of human flourishing.

I don’t know any miners, I’ve only visited one mine in my life, and mining has never been an interest “of mine.”  Jesus, however, does care, and He wants to reach them for His Kingdom.

Today, I want to explore how pervasive nihilism, which is a product of education that insists all we can discuss are material causes and realities, is linked to the rise of foreign fighters like ISIS (also know as ISIL) in Iraq and Syria (a subject I also hinted at in my first blog post on January 3, 2014). 

When asked what they like best about the USA, international students invariably answer: “Freedom!”   Over a delightful lunch recently, one of my international mentees volunteered that during his year here he felt free of his government’s prying eyes.  

Last week I proposed my thesis that the 60s, with its devastating overthrow in the USA of a Christian cultural consensus, could have happened in the 1930s. Today, I explain why the 60s never happened in the 30s….

My surprising claim in this blog is that the rejection of a Christian cultural consensus (as described in my last blog) could have happened in the 1930s instead of the 1960s. Here’s why: The cultural seeds for a post-Christian culture were violently planted during World War I, germinated during the 1920s, and set to blow the Christian lid off American culture.  But, mercifully, the Depression happened, starting in 1929, and Americans started looking heavenward for their daily bread.  And so the 60s never happened until the 1960s.

Events

Events